Hy Blogs — training

Independent Contributor
Hydration for Health and Performance

Hydration for Health and Performance

By STACEY PENNEY, MS, NASM-CPT, CES, PES, FNS · Original Post on NASM.org  Just how much water should you drink on a daily basis? Does the food you eat count toward this amount? Do you need as much water when exercising in the cold as you would in the heat? Will drinking water speed weight loss? Does dehydration affect athletic performance? If you’ve ever had questions like these about hydration, read on to find out why it is so important to keep properly hydrated. We’ve all heard the advice to drink eight glasses of water a day. We’ve probably even told our...

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Independent Contributor
How to Stay Hydrated: 7 Tips for an Active Summer

How to Stay Hydrated: 7 Tips for an Active Summer

By Jake Heikkinen, AT, ATC, CSCS Henry Ford Medical System Not only is H20 an essential nutrient, it literally makes up your entire being: We’re all 40 to 70 percent water, depending on your fitness level and age. And while staying hydrated is always important, it may become more challenging as the weather heats up. Hard-working muscles generate more heat when they’re surrounded by hot air, making it harder for your body to maintain a normal temperature. Even a 1 to 2 percent loss of body weight (from water) can compromise your performance and impact your body’s ability to cool itself....

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Independent Contributor
8 Ways to Ease Post-Workout Muscle Soreness

8 Ways to Ease Post-Workout Muscle Soreness

By Jake Heikkinen, AT, ATC, CSCS  Henry Ford Medical Center If you’ve ever hiked to the top of a mountain, ran a longer distance than you planned or carried a child around the Detroit Zoo, chances are you’ve experienced post-workout muscle soreness. Muscle soreness is a common consequence of overworking your body. Muscles grow and become stronger when they’re subjected to forces that cause microscopic tears in the muscle fibers. Fluid rushes to the area to flush out the damaged cells and build new, stronger muscle cells—and that can be uncomfortable. The discomfort actually has a formal name: delayed onset...

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